Snakes in Excel, Lets Play!


The biggest downside to working in massive corporate offices is the locked down computer systems. There is no internet access, no games, no fun! However, Excel is always installed and kicking. How awesome would it be if Excel had a couple of games in it?

Initially I planned to use Excel’s VBE to create the game in a UserForm, but later, I decided to use Excel’s Interface itself. Neatly stacked square cells could be used to make old school pixel based games. I chose to create that Game which reached millions through our beloved Nokia mobile phones: Snakes.

Snakes

I have added in a lot of comments in the code to help you understand how it works. Take a look at it and let me know what you think. I have used API calls to windows for animating the Snake; and API functions are known to crash Excel, if Excel is not ready when called. My code takes that into account, but it is safe to save and close your workbooks before playing. I developed this in a 64-bit version of Excel 2010. I did created a separate 32-bit version for the API calls, but I have not tested it out myself.

Download Snakes V2.07 64Bit For Struggling To Excel.xlsm from Dropbox and Have Fun! If you have a 32-bit version, Snakes V2.07 32Bit For Struggling To Excel.xlsm should work. Let me know if it doesn’t.

Send it around!  I am sure many of your colleagues would like to squeeze in a game or two between drafting ridiculously long reports.

I am planning to develop another version in which you can draw obstacles in the field. Let me know if you’d like that.

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11 thoughts on “Snakes in Excel, Lets Play!

    • That is actually a long story I meant to write about.

      You may want to prevent users from running intermediate subs in your modules from the macro dialog box.

      One way to accomplish that is to declare it private. However that will prevent you from using the call statement to access subs in other modules.

      You may argue that the run statement can be used, but that is not very ideal for a lot of reasons.

      Adding an argument will ensure that your sub does not get listed in the macro dialogue box.

      Therefore adding an optional dummy boolean argument hides the macro from a user, but still lets you use the call statement.

      I have been using this technique since excel 2003. There is a good chance we don’t need this workaround any more, but I am not sure.

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